How to Get Your Dyslexic Child to Love Reading

November 12, 2013 by Geoff Nixon

How to Get Your Dyslexia Child to Love ReadingLet’s face it. Dyslexia makes reading tough on kids, parents, and teachers, and a lot of us don’t know what to do. There’s plenty of dyslexia reading strategies and resources out there, but how do you know which is best for your child?

The answer is simple. Find out what your child loves, and encourage that passion. She wants to learn about what interests her, so it’s essential that you provide the resources that talk about those interests. Does your child love jokes, mythology, pictures?There are books out there for any niche.

Here are a few we’ve seen work when fostering a love for reading:

  • Back to Front and Upside Down by Claire Alexander: For ages 4-7, this illustrated book follows Stan as he struggles with letters, seeks help from a friend and finds success. Dyslexic children can relate well to Stan’s challenges, plus there’s a coloring page included.
  • Hank Zipzer: The World’s Greatest Underachiever by Henry Winkler and Lin Oliver: We’ve recommended this series before, co-written by Winkler, who’s best known for his role as Fonzie on Happy Days. His sense of humor and personal experience with childhood dyslexia resonates with kids, as we saw firsthand in our interview with Winkler.
  • Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson: Comic strip series can be a great tool for helping your child learn – and love – to read. The images drive the story, intriguing young readers and helping them through the storyline, step by step.
  • Thank You, Mr. Falker by Patricia Polacco: In this story, a girl named Trisha struggles to decipher letters and numbers. She turns to drawing until a new teacher provides the help she needs. Written at a 4.1 reading level, this book is perfect for children facing the struggles of dyslexia. And you can gain dyslexia insights from the author in our interview with her.

Finding the right tool can be difficult, but it’s important that you provide the resources your child needs. You can also consider a dyslexia program to get your child on the right track for reading.

What books do your children love? Share them in the comments to help parents like you.